Kenya’s Amina Mohamed loses bid for AU Chair and was told to correct itself before leading to Africa, Chad takes it


ON JANUARY 30, 2017

Kenya lost the bid to have it’s Foreign Affairs Minister Amina Mohamed become Africa’s top diplomat in a highly competitive vote at the African Union Summit in Addis Ababa Ethiopia Monday.

African Union leaders chose Chad’s candidate to chair the 54-nation body at a summit where the divisive issues of Africa’s relationship to the International Criminal Court and Morocco’s readmission to the AU were on the agenda.

In the last round of seven voting, Chadian Foreign Minister Moussa Faki Mahamat beat Mohamed to secure the post as head of the commission of the AU.

 

The bid to secure leadership at the continental body had seen Kenya campaign strongly across Africa, with President Uhuru Kenyatta sending special envoys to 53 countries.

But in a race that had five candidates, the final battle was between Mohamed and Faki, both distinguished civil servants in the foreign service of their countries.

Ghana’s former foreign minister Thomas Kwesi Qwertey won the deputy chairperson’s seat.

A Chadian official told reporters that his nation’s candidate had secured 39 votes in the final round. Faki, born in 1960, has served as foreign minister since 2008. His previous posts also included a stint as prime minister.

In a race usually resolved in behind-the-scenes talks before a summit vote, three of the AU’s four major regions vied for the post – the south, the east and the largely Francophone west – with some regions pushing more than one candidate.

Outgoing commissioner, South Africa’s Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, stayed in post an extra six months after leaders failed to agree a candidate in July. She is now tipped as a contender to succeed her ex-husband, Jacob Zuma, as South Africa’s president.

Further divisions are likely to be exposed when heads of state decide whether to approve the re-admission of Morocco.

The North African kingdom quit the AU’s predecessor, the Organisation of African Unity, three decades ago amid a dispute over the body’s recognition of Western Sahara, most of which has been controlled by Morocco since 1976.

International Criminal Court

However, King Mohammed VI has been making diplomatic efforts over the last year to try to win Rabat’s readmission.

Continental heavyweights Algeria and South Africa have been backers of the Sahrawi Republic, the domestic political movements that lays claim to the territory along the northern Sahara’s Atlantic seaboard. Neither has said explicitly it will oppose Morocco’s re-entry.

Preliminary meetings have also been dominated by disputes over the International Criminal Court (ICC), which countries such as South Africa and Kenya say is a tool of Western imperialism that unfairly targets the continent.

Conversely, Nigeria, Botswana and other states say the Hague-based court is an important legal backstop for countries whose domestic justice systems have been compromised by civil conflict.

“You have all these calls for unity but actually if you look at the AU now, it is more divided than ever – over Morocco, the regional divisions and the ICC,” said Liesl Louw-Vaudran, an AU expert at the Institute for Security Studies in Pretoria. “It’s unprecedented.”

During Dlamini-Zuma’s time in charge of the AU, the medical doctor has focused on reforming the AU’s dysfunctional internal bureaucracy and drawing up a long-term plan for improving the lives of Africa’s underprivileged citizens, especially women and children.

However, she has been criticized for failing to heal the rifts created by her election and not doing more to prevent conflict in countries such as South Sudan, which the United Nations says is tilting towards genocide.

After the polls, Kenya promptly admitted defeat, with State House spokesperson Manoah Esipisu saying the Kenyan government promising to work with the new chairperson.

“We congratulate him on a race well won. we pledge to work with him to defend the pan-African agenda of integration of Africa as well as democracy,” he said.

He added: “Kenya’s Ambassador Mohamed ran a valiant race. Her candidacy marked the re-emergence of Kenya at the very heart of the pan-African project.

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